But even if you should suffer for the sake of righteousness, you are blessed. And do not fear their intimidation, and do not be troubled, but sanctify Christ as Lord in your hearts, always being ready to make a defense to everyone who asks you to give an account for the hope that is in you yet with gentleness and reverence; and keep a good conscience so that in the thing in which you are slandered, those who revile your good behavior in Christ will be put to shame.  1 Peter 3: 14-16

Mere Orthodoxy - Apologetic Report

The current story of Christian media is not—despite the pain occasioned by the passing ofBooks and Culture—exclusively one of decline and buzzfeedification. This summer marksthe advent of a new annual, edited by Michael Martin, titledJesus the Imagination.

Martin is a Byzantine Rite...

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Tuesday, 18 July 2017 20:00

17776 and the End of Nature

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If you read Hannah Anderson’s Humble Roots a few days before reading Jon Bois’s “17776” you’ll experience a kind of whiplash. Anderson’s book is about gratitude and exploring the ways that creation teaches us about God, about ourselves, and about virtue....

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  • Human beings are created in the image of God, body and soul, and have been called as such “very good.” Our bodily nature reflects God’s goodness to us and the embodied acts that we participate in (eating, sleeping, work, communicating, sexual relations, etc.) are expressions of...

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Sunday, 16 July 2017 20:00

Book Review: Humble Roots by Hannah Anderson

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A couple weeks ago I was reviewing a draft of Kayla Snow’s excellent review of The Long, Long Life of Trees and we began talking about the historically unprecedented ignorance of place that defines many in the west today. A book like Stafford’s can only be written by someone...

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Thursday, 13 July 2017 20:00

Finding the Gospel in Game of Thrones

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Unless you’re living under a rock (or the proverbial bushel), it’s impossible to have missed the phenomenon that isGame of Thrones. Part fantasy epic, part prestige television, its controversial subject matter has made it a bit of a touchy subject for Christians. Both straight-laced...

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We live in an age of remarkably high levels of economic disruption brought about by technological developments. That’s a truism, of course, but it’s as good a starting place as any for considering the book we are discussing today. As the internet has become more entrenched, the...

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I’m pleased to publish this guest review by Joshua Novalis.

Every morning, on my way to work, I drive past an apartment complex amusingly named Walden Pond. While I’ve never spoken with the owners, I assume the name to be their attempt to woo prospective tenants with the cozy idea that...

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I’m pleased to publish this book review by Kayla Snow.

Any book written with the expressed intention of moving its readers to stop reading is one that piques my curiosity. When that book is about trees, I am especially intrigued. And, this is what Fiona Stafford, a professor of English at the...

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Tuesday, 27 June 2017 20:00

Book Review: One by One by Gina Dalfonzo

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In One by One, Gina Dalfonzo capably explains the many challenges that singles face in participating in local Christian communities and lays out some ideas on how churches can do better in this important area. (Dalfonzo rightly notes that as more and more young Americans choose to delay...

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Chapter five is, so far, the most contemporary essay in Du Bois’s book. In it, he considers the city of Atlanta and what it says about the future of both African Americans and the South more broadly considered. He begins by noting how appropriate “Atlanta” is as a name...

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Thursday, 22 June 2017 20:00

Book Review: Reclaiming Hope by Michael Wear

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In Reclaiming Hope Michael Wear has written an engaging, clarifying work that nevertheless fails because it does not properly distinguish between a person’s testimony and their political theology. As such, the book often begins well before veering off into needless ambiguity due to a...

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This guest review is written by Ben Whisenant.

Nebraska Senator Ben Sasse has written a book about raising children to be adults, and strangely for a book written by a sitting politician, it contains no concrete policy proposals. It’s a truism, especially on the political right, that...

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Sunday, 18 June 2017 20:00

On Father’s Day, Living in Losses, and Home

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There’s nothing that can prepare you to touch your father’s arm and find that it’s frozen. I should have known, of course. Doctors had told us what they were doing and said he’d be cold. But it’s one thing to know he’ll be cold. It’s another to feel...

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Thursday, 15 June 2017 20:00

Lessons from the UK for American Evangelicals

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You’ll have to forgive my sounding like something of a broken record by this point, but I couldn’t let this news pass without flagging it for Mere O readers:

Tim Farron has announced his resignation as Liberal Democrat leader after he was repeatedly pressed during the general election...

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Wednesday, 14 June 2017 20:00

On Ben Sasse, Civil Society, and Voting Records

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Last week Matthew Walther went hard after one of my Senators, Ben Sasse, in a piece for The Week. The piece wandered a bit, but I basically agreed with it: It’s hard to make sense of Sasse as a politician because there is, from where a lot of us are sitting, a large gap between his...

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I cannot remember reading an essay that has moved me as much as Margaret Talbot’s devastating New Yorker piece on our opioid crisis. The prose is mostly unadorned, because it can be. Many of the stories Talbot recounts are so tragic they need no embellishment; others are so inspiring that...

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In chapter four Du Bois reflects on his time teaching at a black one-room schoolhouse in rural Tennessee. As such, most of the chapter is simply taken up with recounting what life looked like for an itinerant black school teacher in rural Tennessee in the late 19th century:

There came a day when all...

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When Francis and Edith Schaeffer were writing about issues like ecology, home, and place in the late 1960s and early 70s, they were to the best of my knowledge the only evangelicals doing so. While they laid great foundations with Pollution and the Death of Man (Francis, 1970) and Hidden...

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Thursday, 08 June 2017 20:00

How Marketing Jargon Poisons Christian Community

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We’ll be back to normal posting next week (I’ve been traveling for the past week which has made writing and editing difficult), but for the moment I wanted to flag a short review from the latest issue of Christianity Today and make one brief remark on it.

The review is by Joy...

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Tuesday, 30 May 2017 20:00

Martin Bucer’s Strenuous Life

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Reading Sen. Ben Sasse’s recent book The Vanishing American Adult reminded me of a chapter I read about the home life of Martin Bucer, a 16th century pastor and leader in the Protestant Reformation. Though his lifestyle was not that aberrant amongst the other reform leaders, it...

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We’re continuing our exploration of Du Bois’s Souls of Black Folk today with a brief overview of chapter three. Chapter three may well be one of the most timely in the entire book. Though primarily about Booker T. Washington, the issues that Washington’s work raised as...

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It’s not that I ever pictured C. S. Lewis as a sixteen year old girl. It’s that when I was one, and readingSurprised by Joy for the first time, I thought of him as a peer. Was this because he had such a vivid memory, such accurate recollection of his own sixteen year old self? Or...

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Friends,

There is an urgent soul-cry from the culture. From our neighbors. This cry has been silenced by the church and ignored by the media.

Hepatitis C.

Yes, Hepatitis C.

Here are the facts about Hepatitis C,according to this article I just read yesterday:

Hepatitis C is spread mainly by...

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One of the main points Du Bois is developing throughout his book is that, to quote him directly, “the defining problem of the 20th century [was] the color line.”

He continues to develop this point in chapter two, which he begins this way:

The problem of the twentieth century is the...

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Wednesday, 10 May 2017 22:00

Book Review: Children of Men by P. D. James

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All dystopian literature aspires to prophecy. Whether or not it aims to predict the future, it imagines worlds in which the evils of our own place and time are drawn out to their logical conclusions. It holds up a mirror for recognition and critique. Its success depends on two main factors: its...

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